Mixing desk basics

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Mixing desk basics 2017-09-11T11:09:03+00:00

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  • DSP
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    Post count: 3
    #522 |

    Hello good people! Long time no see. So long in fact, that I didn’t realise the forum had moved!
    Anyway.

    Taken a bit of a break from drumming for various reasons, but recently got a ‘We’re putting the band back together (for a friend’s 50th)!’ call, so have been blowing out the cobwebs recently.

    One thing I definitely need to do is figure out is exactly how my mixer works. Still not sure why I ended up buying the PA (isn’t that the keyboard player’s job?), but I’ve got a basic system : a Yamaha MG166CX mixer, Alto main speakers and some Laney foldback, but to be honest on the few occasions I’ve used it, it’s been a bit hit and miss, and we never used to use foldback (I’ve only recently picked up the Laneys).

    What I’m looking for is an idiot’s guide to using the mixer – I understand most of it, but I still don’t feel confident with the Aux outs for on-stage monitor mixing. For example, there appears to be three Aux controls, two ‘regular’ and one for the onboard digital effects. That says to me that I could have two, and no more, seperate mixes on stage, even if I had more monitors.

    So why are there seemingly four Aux output jacks?

    I’m sure it’s all pretty simple really, and once I’ve got it, I’ll be away, but I hate not understanding.

    Very much a case of ‘some of the gear and no idea!’

    Any advice or pointers towards a decent online guide or book would be much appreciated!

    Cheers!

    • This topic was modified 3 months ago by  DSP.
    Hector1
    Participant
    Post count: 168

    http://www.arcone-tec.de/technik/yamaha_mischpult.pdf

    Hopefully this will help-they are quite straight forward-just treat everything as a single channel for the first few goes then work on the signal paths-EQ-then effects. In other words there are some basic procedures to follow but the manuals are pretty comprehensive and Yamaha Mixer’s at this level are quite good actually.

    DSP
    Participant
    Post count: 3

    That looks ideal! Many thanks, Hector.

    Hector1
    Participant
    Post count: 168

    Hi -many apologies for such a late reply back to this thread-that’s great to hear and thanks for the feedback :)Not sure where you are based but if your anywhere within reason of the Stables Music Venue in Milton Keynes they run some great courses there of which one that may help you considerably called ‘Introduction to Live sound Engineering’. Its a one day course and very practical and extremely well hosted and would probably help a lot with other modules that they teach along the way. The cost is usually around £40 but the staff are superb and don’t worry about qualifications etc-its all about gaining knowledge from practical experience and obviously some great tutoring aswell. I have done level 1 myself and a couple of weeks ago went to the Sound recording course Level 1 and going back for Level 2 in February next year.

    Take a look and see what you think.

    http://www.stables.org

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